Recent Workshops

Ongoing: Jan 22, 29, Feb 5, 12

Photo Classes – our new format for the winter

We’ve been asked to expand our base level Workshop, into a 4 week series of classes, still totally hands-on, 2 hours each. The dates will be Jan 22, Jan 29, Feb 5, and Feb 12. Snow date will be Feb 19. 1pm to 3pm.

Hosted by ArtEtc in Newton NJ. A new, VERY photography friendly Gallery, (where you can also have World Class Archival mounting and framing done for you – or just pick up the best supplies you can get anywhere at REALLY good prices.)

We’re covering IN DETAIL:

(1) Why your camera acts the way it does.

Exposure Compensation; what under and over exposed images look like, and how to adjust on your camera.

How to “bracket” your exposures, and why. In-class exercises with your camera, so you can understand and remember how to do this.

(2) Aperture. What it controls. What Depth of Focus means, and how you can use it to make outstanding photos. In-class exercises on your camera, showing how to control the location and depth of sharpness in your shots. How to apply this to landscapes,  still life and portraits.

(3) Shutter Speed. How it controls your subject’s motion. The 3 methods of illustrating motion – and how to do this on your own camera, in-class. How to “Stop Motion” with a fast shutter speed. How to “Pan” your camera to show the subject sharp against a blurred background. How to “Imply” motion with a slow shutter speed – think those silky waterfall photos.

(4) Going Manual – This is our ultimate goal for every one of our members. Being comfortable in Manual Mode. We’ll show you how to take control of your camera, and get the photos you want. Whether you need to control for depth of focus or motion, we’ll go step by step, with your camera to help you understand how to “make all the parts work together”. Time permitting we’ll also illustrate how easy it is to process your images so they’re sharp, adjust color, contrast, etc.

The 4 classes are designed to help you understand and REMEMBER how to use your camera to make YOUR photos look great.

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Jan 21, 10-12 Exclusive access to local museum WITH tripods

We had an amazing opportunity to start off the new year. Exclusive access to the Sparta Historical Society building, with Joy and Clarke helping where needed, and keeping out of they way otherwise. A great mix of Meetup attendees, from VERY experienced to  (admittedly our favorite) those who just took the new camera out of the box. LOTs of very cool vignettes in 6 rooms; parlor, school room, 2 bedrooms, mineral room from local mining, a farming model room, and a seriously spooky attic. Details everywhere you looked.

The 2 hour session was limited to 10 people. We WILL be able to add dates, in Feb. and March. We’ll be doing photos for 90 minutes, and have a half-hour period for help on editing and cropping suggestions.

It proved to be a great opportunity to learn how to shoot rooms, vignettes, still life’s and more, in a historically accurate setting. You can go from Fine Art to down-right Creepy if you want…

Sample photos below.

What a great time…

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July 12, 2016 – Master Your Camera

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Hosted by Terry Neff, in an incredibly nice setting, we continued to explore Aperture and Shutter Speed Priority Modes. We had 11 students in this workshop – plus Terry who wore many hats – hostess, student and chronicler of events. After  brief intro discussion inside, Joy and Clarke split the group – one started with Aperture, the other Shutter Speed, and out into the bright sunny yard we went. The goal of the Aperture group was to learn how it affects depth of field; how to get a very shallow – or a very deep focus range. Students finished up the exercise by getting very low to the ground, and holding focus from 2′ to 30′ away, with a combination of aperture and focus point. No one thought we could do it. Thanks Terry – great idea.

 

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The other group started at the very cool waterfall, and searched for the right Shutter Speed – that would give us that very silky look to the water. At the beginning of our exercise, still using a faster shutter speed, student Gene Arnold, found a very nice perspective, and got this shot as the light came through the trees and lit up the little flower on the rocks.

 

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We were prepared this time for the many questions about student’s cameras. We spent a good deal of time helping them find their “Exposure Compensation” adjusters,  the entire group was using it throughout, and those “Why does my camera act like this?” questions were answered. The 3rd part of the day was spent back inside – out of the heat, yes there were goodies, as we went over everyone’s shots, did some editing, handled questions, and gathered feedback. Very fulfilling session for the instructors – we had a student who finally had the nerve to take their new camera out of the box for the first time – got past the “what dial does what” stage, and we hope is on the path to a great new hobby. We also confirmed our need to create a new Workshop – focused (sorry) on familiarizing yourselves with your cameras. What DO these wheels and dials do? You’ll find it in our Workshop Calendar here.

May15, 2016 – Shakedown Cruise

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Hosted by the Speakeasy gallery in Boonton,  we started the afternoon by exploring Aperture Priority Mode. Students did Photos of their grizzled instructor, and worked out how to soften the background with their camera and the lens they would most commonly use. They learned to apply the Exposure Compensation adjustment as well, to fine-tune their shots and minimize post-processing. 

Crazy River

Next was a quick walk down to a very angry river, and the search for the perfect shutter speed. Shutter Priority Mode allowed us to concentrate on capturing the water with just enough detail in that beautiful silky style, right in-camera.  At the end of the day, we spent some time going over  our shots in detail, saving the best and completing our notes on just how we accomplished each set of photos. We did a little editing to make them Pop, and called it a day, with grins all around.